All Smallholder Farmers Prospering in an Interconnected Digital World

Mercy Corps is a global team of humanitarians who partner with communities, corporations and governments to transform lives around the world. Our AgriFin model leverages the power and prevalence of mobile phones to help smallholder farmers access digital services to build resilience and boost their harvests and incomes. Since 2012, AgriFin has worked with a global network of over 70 partners to help 3.5 million farmers across Africa and Asia. Now, as population growth and climate change collide to create new challenges for farmers worldwide, AgriFin is partnering with NASA to build digital tools that will adapt to a changing climate.

News and features

Building Zambia’s first Digital Financial Services Platform for smallholder farmers

Mercy Corps’ AgriFin Accelerate program worked with the Zambia National Commercial Bank (ZANACO), as an innovation partner by developing a farmer-centric product, business modelling, and brokering relevant partnerships to launch…

Promoting Smallholder Uptake, Adoption and Referral of Soil Testing Services

What are the factors that drive soil testing and subsequent uptake of soil treatment recommendations by smallholders? Read the full report and infographic. Yields and production of smallholder farms in sub-Saharan Africa…

6 Strategies to Promote Digital Financial Product Adoption Among Youth

HaloYako is a digitally enabled saving service in Tanzania offered by Halotel in partnership with FINCA Microfinance Bank and supported in part by Mercy Corps Agrifin Accelerate, a partner of the Mastercard Foundation. HaloYako allows users…

Youth in Agriculture: A New Generation Leverages Technology

Youth don’t often see a future in agriculture. This is even the case in Kenya, where about 65 percent of the population lives in rural areas, and 70 percent of…

Measuring the DigiFarm Impact: Initial Insights from the Randomised Control Study

The first experiment (Sample I) studies the MVP solution and randomly divides a sample of 3,152 households into four groups: MVP encouragement only, MVP and M-SHWARI encouragements, M-SHWARI encouragement only,…

From traditional classroom learning to household tablet learning: The Smallholders’ Capacity Building Solution?

The growing penetration of digital technology in Tanzania is reaching even low-income populations, providing access to individuals who were previously excluded from digital financial services such as payments, savings, loans…

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